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National Program
Symposia
2017 Gairdner Research Symposium
October 27, 2017
9:00 AM

The Gairdner Foundation’s annual research symposia convene world-renowned scientists to discuss relevant global health topics and share their cutting-edge research with audiences.

The theme of Gairdner’s 2017 Friday Symposium is “New frontiers in targeted therapies for human health,” with each of our six speakers presenting on a variety of related topics.

We look forward to seeing you there!




Event Information

october, 2017

october, 2017

201727oct9:00 am- 1:00 pm2017 Gairdner Research SymposiumNew frontiers in targeted therapies for human health9:00 am - 1:00 pm EDT University of Toronto MacLeod Auditorium, 1 King's College CircleEvent Type:National Program,SymposiaEvent Audience:Biomedical Scientists,Public,Students

Event Details

The Gairdner Foundation’s annual research symposia convene world-renowned scientists to discuss relevant global health topics and share their cutting-edge research with audiences.

The theme of Gairdner’s 2017 Friday Symposium is “New frontiers in targeted therapies for human health,” with each of our six speakers presenting on a variety of related topics.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Time

(Friday) 9:00 am - 1:00 pm EDT

Location

University of Toronto MacLeod Auditorium

1 King's College Circle

Organizer

Gairdner Foundation

Speakers for this event

  • Adrian R. Krainer, Ph.D.

    Adrian R. Krainer, Ph.D.

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    Dr. Adrian Krainer is the St Giles Professor of Molecular Genetics and Program Chair of Cancer & Molecular Biology at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which he joined in 1986. He received a B.A. in Biochemistry from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Harvard University. His laboratory studies pre-mRNA splicing regulation, and is also engaged in developing targeted therapies to correct or modulate alternative splicing in genetic diseases and cancer. Together with Ionis Pharmaceuticals, they developed nusinersen (Spinraza), an antisense-oligonucleotide drug that corrects defective splicing of the SMN2 gene and is the first FDA/EMA-approved therapy for spinal muscular atrophy, an inherited motor-neuron disease. Prof. Krainer is a Pew Biomedical Scholar, a MERIT-award recipient from the NIH, a past President of the RNA Society, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Royal Society of Medicine. He has authored ~200 publications and 18 patents.

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

  • Emma Allen-Vercoe, Ph.D.

    Emma Allen-Vercoe, Ph.D.

    Professor, University of Guelph; CSO, NuBiyota LLC

    Emma obtained her BSc (Hons) in biochemistry in 1993 from the University of London, and her PhD in molecular microbiology through an industrial partnership with the Veterinary Laboratories Agency in 1999. Her PhD studies focused on virulence determinants of Salmonella enterica, and her postdoctoral years (in the UK, at the Centre for Applied Microbiological Research (now Public Health England)) as well as at the University of Calgary expanded this work and provided an opportunity to work on a range of different bacterial species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Campylobacter jejuni and enterohemorrhagic E.coli. In 2005, Emma won a Fellow-to-Faculty transition award through the Canadian Association of Gastroenterologists/AstraZeneca and CIHR, that allowed her to start her independent career in Calgary in 2006. She chose to study the normal microbes of the human gut, at that time an emerging area of interest, and focused on trying to culture these so-called ‘unculturable’ microbes in order to better understand their biology. To do this, she developed a model gut system (dubbed ‘Robogut’) to emulate the conditions of the human gut and allow communities of microbes to grow together, as they do naturally. Emma moved her lab and this system to the University of Guelph in late 2007, and has been a recent recipient of the John Evans Leader’s Fund (through the Canadian Foundation for Innovation) that has allowed her to develop her specialist anaerobic fermentation laboratory further. She currently manages a lab of 11 people with projects that are broad in nature, but united under the banner of human microbiome research, including studies of Clostridioides difficile infection, diabetes, colorectal cancer, and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. In 2013, Emma co-founded NuBiyota, a research spin-off company that aims to create therapeutic ecosystems as biologic drugs, on a commercial scale.

    Professor, University of Guelph; CSO, NuBiyota LLC

  • Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D.

    Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Molecular Genetics, Hubrecht Institute, Director Research, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology

    Hans Clevers obtained his MD degree in 1984 and his PhD degree in 1985 from the University Utrecht, the Netherlands. His postdoctoral work (1986-1989) was done with Cox Terhorst at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute of the Harvard University, Boston, USA. From 1991-2002 Hans Clevers was Professor in Immunology at the University Utrecht and, since 2002, Professor in Molecular Genetics. From 2002-2012 he was director of the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht. From 2012-2015 he was President of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). Since June 1, 2015 he is director Research of the Princess Maxima Center for pediatric oncology. Hans Clevers has been a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences since 2000, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 2012 and a member of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA since 2014. He is the recipient of several awards, including the Dutch Spinoza Award in 2001, the Swiss Louis Jeantet Prize in 2004, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Katharine Berkan Judd Award in 2005, the Israeli Rabbi Shai Shacknai Memorial Prize in 2006, the Dutch Josephine Nefkens Prize for Cancer Research and the German Meyenburg Cancer Research Award in 2008, the Dutch Cancer Society Award in 2009, the United European Gastroenterology Federation (UEGF) Research Prize in 2010, the German Ernst Jung-Preis für Medizin in 2011, the French Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer (ARC) Léopold Griffuel Prize, the Heineken Prize in 2012, the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences in 2013, the co-recipient of the 2015 ISSCR McEwen Award for Innovation and in 2016 the Academy Professor Prize and the Körber European Science Prize in 2016. He obtained two ERC Advanced Investigator grants (2008 and 2016). He is Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur since 2005 and Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion since 2012.

    Professor of Molecular Genetics, Hubrecht Institute, Director Research, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology

  • Helen H. Hobbs, M.D., Ph.D.

    Helen H. Hobbs, M.D., Ph.D.

    Investigator, HHMI Director, McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

    Helen Hobbs is a physician-scientist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where she directs the McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development. She has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 2002. In partnership with Jonathan Cohen, she has identified genes and sequence variations that contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders with a focus on lipids and lipoproteins. By concentrating on alleles of low frequency and large phenotypic effect size, Hobbs and Cohen discovered new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of heart disease. They identified mutations in PCSK9 that reduce LDL-cholesterol levels and protect individuals from heart attacks − a discovery that stimulated pharmaceutical companies to develop FDA-approved drugs that target PCSK9 and prevent heart attacks in patients treated with statins. More recently, they identified the first genetic variants that contribute to fatty liver disease (hepatic steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma). Hobbs was elected to the National Academy of Medicine (2004) and the National Academy of Sciences (2007) and was recipient of the American Heart Association Distinguished Scientist Award (2007), the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize from Rockefeller University (2015), the 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences (2016), and the Passano Award (with Jonathan Cohen) (2016).

    Investigator, HHMI Director, McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

  • Michael A. Laflamme, M.D., Ph.D

    Michael A. Laflamme, M.D., Ph.D

    Senior Scientist, University Health Network

    Dr. Michael Laflamme is the Robert McEwen Chair in Cardiac Regenerative Medicine at University Health Network and a Senior Scientist in the Toronto General Hospital Research Institute. After obtaining an undergraduate degree in Physics at Georgetown University, Dr. Laflamme completed the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program at Emory University, where he studied the regulation of calcium homeostasis by beta-adrenergic signaling in adult ventricular cardiomyocytes. After residency in Anatomic Pathology and subspecialty training in Cardiovascular Pathology at the University of Washington Medical Center, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Charles Murry, investigating the role of exogenous and endogenous stem cells in myocardial repair. His independent research career has been largely focused on the development of cell therapies based on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and his laboratory has made a number of important contributions in this area including 1) widely-used protocols to guide the differentiation of hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells into cardiomyocytes or specialized cardiac subtypes (e.g. ventricular myocytes versus pacemaker cells), 2) the first proof-of-concept study showing that the transplantation of hESC-CMs can “remuscularize” scar tissue and improve left ventricular contractile function in rodent MI models, and 3) the first direct demonstration that grafts of hESC-CMs can electrically couple with host myocardium following transplantation in injured hearts. Dr. Laflamme has been the recipient of honors including the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology Young Investigator Award, the Perkins Coie Award for Discovery and the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Outstanding New Investigator Award. He is also a board-certified physician in Anatomic Pathology and practices diagnostic Cardiovascular Pathology.

    Senior Scientist, University Health Network

  • Michel A. Sadelain, M.D., Ph.D.

    Michel A. Sadelain, M.D., Ph.D.

    Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

    Michel Sadelain, MD, PhD, is the Director of the Center for Cell Engineering and the incumbent of the Stephen and Barbara Friedman Chair at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Sadelain’s research focuses on human cell engineering and cell therapy to treat cancer and hereditary blood disorders. His laboratory has made several seminal contributions to the field of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), from design to clinical translation. His group was the first to publish dramatic molecular remissions in patients with chemorefractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia following treatment with CD19 CAR T cells.

    Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Schedule

    • Day 1
    • October 27, 2017
    • 9:00 am Welcome Remarks9:00 am - 9:10 amJanet Rossant, President & Scientific Director, Gairdner Foundation

    • October 27, 2017
    • 9:10 am Chair9:10 am - 9:15 amMansoor Husain, Executive Director, Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, Toronto, ON

    • October 27, 2017
    • 9:15 am Bugs as drugs: modifying the human gut microbiome with ‘microbial ecosystem therapeutics’9:15 am - 9:45 amEmma Allen-Vercoe, PhD, Professor, University of Guelph; CSO, NuBiyota LLC

    • October 27, 2017
    • 9:45 am Heart regeneration with pluripotent stem cells9:45 am - 10:15 amMichael A. Laflamme, MD, PhD Senior Scientist, University Health Network

    • October 27, 2017
    • 10:15 am Health Break10:15 am - 10:30 am10:30-10:35 am Chair: Mansoor Husain, Executive Director, Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, Toronto, ON

    • October 27, 2017
    • 10:35 am Stem cell-grown organoids as models for human disease10:35 am - 11:05 amHans Clevers, MD, PhD, Professor of Molecular Genetics, Hubrecht Institute, Director Research, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology

    • October 27, 2017
    • 11:05 am Simple genetics for a complex disease: getting to the heart of the matter11:05 am - 11:35 amHelen H. Hobbs, Investigator, HHMI; Director, McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

    • October 27, 2017
    • 11:35 am Health Break11:35 am - 11:50 am11:50-11:55 am Chair: Bradly Wouters, Executive Vice-President, Science and Research University Health Network, Toronto, ON

    • October 27, 2017
    • 11:55 am Nusinersen (SpinrazaTM): The First FDA Approved Treatment for SMA11:55 am - 12:25 pmProf. Adrian R. Krainer, PhD, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    • October 27, 2017
    • 12:25 pm Therapeutic T cell engineering: CD19 CAR therapy and beyond12:25 pm - 12:55 pmMichel Sadelain, MD, PhD, Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

    • October 27, 2017
    • 12:55 pm Thanks & Conclusion12:55 pm - 1:00 pmJanet Rossant President &Scientific Director Gairdner Foundation

201727oct9:00 am- 1:00 pm2017 Gairdner Research SymposiumNew frontiers in targeted therapies for human health9:00 am - 1:00 pm EDT University of Toronto MacLeod Auditorium, 1 King's College CircleEvent Type:National Program,SymposiaEvent Audience:Biomedical Scientists,Public,Students

Event Details

The Gairdner Foundation’s annual research symposia convene world-renowned scientists to discuss relevant global health topics and share their cutting-edge research with audiences.

The theme of Gairdner’s 2017 Friday Symposium is “New frontiers in targeted therapies for human health,” with each of our six speakers presenting on a variety of related topics.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Time

(Friday) 9:00 am - 1:00 pm EDT

Location

University of Toronto MacLeod Auditorium

1 King's College Circle

Organizer

Gairdner Foundation

Speakers for this event

  • Adrian R. Krainer, Ph.D.

    Adrian R. Krainer, Ph.D.

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    Dr. Adrian Krainer is the St Giles Professor of Molecular Genetics and Program Chair of Cancer & Molecular Biology at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, which he joined in 1986. He received a B.A. in Biochemistry from Columbia University and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Harvard University. His laboratory studies pre-mRNA splicing regulation, and is also engaged in developing targeted therapies to correct or modulate alternative splicing in genetic diseases and cancer. Together with Ionis Pharmaceuticals, they developed nusinersen (Spinraza), an antisense-oligonucleotide drug that corrects defective splicing of the SMN2 gene and is the first FDA/EMA-approved therapy for spinal muscular atrophy, an inherited motor-neuron disease. Prof. Krainer is a Pew Biomedical Scholar, a MERIT-award recipient from the NIH, a past President of the RNA Society, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Royal Society of Medicine. He has authored ~200 publications and 18 patents.

    Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

  • Emma Allen-Vercoe, Ph.D.

    Emma Allen-Vercoe, Ph.D.

    Professor, University of Guelph; CSO, NuBiyota LLC

    Emma obtained her BSc (Hons) in biochemistry in 1993 from the University of London, and her PhD in molecular microbiology through an industrial partnership with the Veterinary Laboratories Agency in 1999. Her PhD studies focused on virulence determinants of Salmonella enterica, and her postdoctoral years (in the UK, at the Centre for Applied Microbiological Research (now Public Health England)) as well as at the University of Calgary expanded this work and provided an opportunity to work on a range of different bacterial species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Campylobacter jejuni and enterohemorrhagic E.coli. In 2005, Emma won a Fellow-to-Faculty transition award through the Canadian Association of Gastroenterologists/AstraZeneca and CIHR, that allowed her to start her independent career in Calgary in 2006. She chose to study the normal microbes of the human gut, at that time an emerging area of interest, and focused on trying to culture these so-called ‘unculturable’ microbes in order to better understand their biology. To do this, she developed a model gut system (dubbed ‘Robogut’) to emulate the conditions of the human gut and allow communities of microbes to grow together, as they do naturally. Emma moved her lab and this system to the University of Guelph in late 2007, and has been a recent recipient of the John Evans Leader’s Fund (through the Canadian Foundation for Innovation) that has allowed her to develop her specialist anaerobic fermentation laboratory further. She currently manages a lab of 11 people with projects that are broad in nature, but united under the banner of human microbiome research, including studies of Clostridioides difficile infection, diabetes, colorectal cancer, and neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis. In 2013, Emma co-founded NuBiyota, a research spin-off company that aims to create therapeutic ecosystems as biologic drugs, on a commercial scale.

    Professor, University of Guelph; CSO, NuBiyota LLC

  • Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D.

    Hans Clevers, M.D., Ph.D.

    Professor of Molecular Genetics, Hubrecht Institute, Director Research, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology

    Hans Clevers obtained his MD degree in 1984 and his PhD degree in 1985 from the University Utrecht, the Netherlands. His postdoctoral work (1986-1989) was done with Cox Terhorst at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute of the Harvard University, Boston, USA. From 1991-2002 Hans Clevers was Professor in Immunology at the University Utrecht and, since 2002, Professor in Molecular Genetics. From 2002-2012 he was director of the Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht. From 2012-2015 he was President of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). Since June 1, 2015 he is director Research of the Princess Maxima Center for pediatric oncology. Hans Clevers has been a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences since 2000, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 2012 and a member of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA since 2014. He is the recipient of several awards, including the Dutch Spinoza Award in 2001, the Swiss Louis Jeantet Prize in 2004, the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Katharine Berkan Judd Award in 2005, the Israeli Rabbi Shai Shacknai Memorial Prize in 2006, the Dutch Josephine Nefkens Prize for Cancer Research and the German Meyenburg Cancer Research Award in 2008, the Dutch Cancer Society Award in 2009, the United European Gastroenterology Federation (UEGF) Research Prize in 2010, the German Ernst Jung-Preis für Medizin in 2011, the French Association pour la Recherche sur le Cancer (ARC) Léopold Griffuel Prize, the Heineken Prize in 2012, the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences in 2013, the co-recipient of the 2015 ISSCR McEwen Award for Innovation and in 2016 the Academy Professor Prize and the Körber European Science Prize in 2016. He obtained two ERC Advanced Investigator grants (2008 and 2016). He is Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur since 2005 and Knight in the Order of the Netherlands Lion since 2012.

    Professor of Molecular Genetics, Hubrecht Institute, Director Research, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology

  • Helen H. Hobbs, M.D., Ph.D.

    Helen H. Hobbs, M.D., Ph.D.

    Investigator, HHMI Director, McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

    Helen Hobbs is a physician-scientist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where she directs the McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development. She has been an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute since 2002. In partnership with Jonathan Cohen, she has identified genes and sequence variations that contribute to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders with a focus on lipids and lipoproteins. By concentrating on alleles of low frequency and large phenotypic effect size, Hobbs and Cohen discovered new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of heart disease. They identified mutations in PCSK9 that reduce LDL-cholesterol levels and protect individuals from heart attacks − a discovery that stimulated pharmaceutical companies to develop FDA-approved drugs that target PCSK9 and prevent heart attacks in patients treated with statins. More recently, they identified the first genetic variants that contribute to fatty liver disease (hepatic steatosis, steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma). Hobbs was elected to the National Academy of Medicine (2004) and the National Academy of Sciences (2007) and was recipient of the American Heart Association Distinguished Scientist Award (2007), the Pearl Meister Greengard Prize from Rockefeller University (2015), the 2016 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences (2016), and the Passano Award (with Jonathan Cohen) (2016).

    Investigator, HHMI Director, McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

  • Michael A. Laflamme, M.D., Ph.D

    Michael A. Laflamme, M.D., Ph.D

    Senior Scientist, University Health Network

    Dr. Michael Laflamme is the Robert McEwen Chair in Cardiac Regenerative Medicine at University Health Network and a Senior Scientist in the Toronto General Hospital Research Institute. After obtaining an undergraduate degree in Physics at Georgetown University, Dr. Laflamme completed the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program at Emory University, where he studied the regulation of calcium homeostasis by beta-adrenergic signaling in adult ventricular cardiomyocytes. After residency in Anatomic Pathology and subspecialty training in Cardiovascular Pathology at the University of Washington Medical Center, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the laboratory of Dr. Charles Murry, investigating the role of exogenous and endogenous stem cells in myocardial repair. His independent research career has been largely focused on the development of cell therapies based on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and his laboratory has made a number of important contributions in this area including 1) widely-used protocols to guide the differentiation of hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells into cardiomyocytes or specialized cardiac subtypes (e.g. ventricular myocytes versus pacemaker cells), 2) the first proof-of-concept study showing that the transplantation of hESC-CMs can “remuscularize” scar tissue and improve left ventricular contractile function in rodent MI models, and 3) the first direct demonstration that grafts of hESC-CMs can electrically couple with host myocardium following transplantation in injured hearts. Dr. Laflamme has been the recipient of honors including the Society for Cardiovascular Pathology Young Investigator Award, the Perkins Coie Award for Discovery and the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Outstanding New Investigator Award. He is also a board-certified physician in Anatomic Pathology and practices diagnostic Cardiovascular Pathology.

    Senior Scientist, University Health Network

  • Michel A. Sadelain, M.D., Ph.D.

    Michel A. Sadelain, M.D., Ph.D.

    Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

    Michel Sadelain, MD, PhD, is the Director of the Center for Cell Engineering and the incumbent of the Stephen and Barbara Friedman Chair at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Sadelain’s research focuses on human cell engineering and cell therapy to treat cancer and hereditary blood disorders. His laboratory has made several seminal contributions to the field of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), from design to clinical translation. His group was the first to publish dramatic molecular remissions in patients with chemorefractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia following treatment with CD19 CAR T cells.

    Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Schedule

    • Day 1
    • October 27, 2017
    • 9:00 am Welcome Remarks9:00 am - 9:10 amJanet Rossant, President & Scientific Director, Gairdner Foundation

    • October 27, 2017
    • 9:10 am Chair9:10 am - 9:15 amMansoor Husain, Executive Director, Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, Toronto, ON

    • October 27, 2017
    • 9:15 am Bugs as drugs: modifying the human gut microbiome with ‘microbial ecosystem therapeutics’9:15 am - 9:45 amEmma Allen-Vercoe, PhD, Professor, University of Guelph; CSO, NuBiyota LLC

    • October 27, 2017
    • 9:45 am Heart regeneration with pluripotent stem cells9:45 am - 10:15 amMichael A. Laflamme, MD, PhD Senior Scientist, University Health Network

    • October 27, 2017
    • 10:15 am Health Break10:15 am - 10:30 am10:30-10:35 am Chair: Mansoor Husain, Executive Director, Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research, Toronto, ON

    • October 27, 2017
    • 10:35 am Stem cell-grown organoids as models for human disease10:35 am - 11:05 amHans Clevers, MD, PhD, Professor of Molecular Genetics, Hubrecht Institute, Director Research, Princess Maxima Center for Pediatric Oncology

    • October 27, 2017
    • 11:05 am Simple genetics for a complex disease: getting to the heart of the matter11:05 am - 11:35 amHelen H. Hobbs, Investigator, HHMI; Director, McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development; University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

    • October 27, 2017
    • 11:35 am Health Break11:35 am - 11:50 am11:50-11:55 am Chair: Bradly Wouters, Executive Vice-President, Science and Research University Health Network, Toronto, ON

    • October 27, 2017
    • 11:55 am Nusinersen (SpinrazaTM): The First FDA Approved Treatment for SMA11:55 am - 12:25 pmProf. Adrian R. Krainer, PhD, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

    • October 27, 2017
    • 12:25 pm Therapeutic T cell engineering: CD19 CAR therapy and beyond12:25 pm - 12:55 pmMichel Sadelain, MD, PhD, Director, Center for Cell Engineering, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

    • October 27, 2017
    • 12:55 pm Thanks & Conclusion12:55 pm - 1:00 pmJanet Rossant President &Scientific Director Gairdner Foundation




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