X
National Program
Symposia
2017 Gairdner Laureate Symposium
October 26, 2017
9:00 AM

Featuring all seven of our 2017 Canada Gairdner Award laureates, The Gairdner Foundation’s annual laureate research symposium brings together leading Canadian and international scientists to share their ground breaking biomedical research with audiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 




Event Information

october, 2017

october, 2017

201726oct9:00 am- 2:45 pm2017 Gairdner Laureate Symposium9:00 am - 2:45 pm EDT University of Toronto MacLeod Auditorium, 1 King's College CircleEvent Type:National Program,SymposiaEvent Audience:Biomedical Scientists,Public,Students

Event Details

Featuring all seven of our 2017 Canada Gairdner Award laureates, The Gairdner Foundation’s annual laureate research symposium brings together leading Canadian and international scientists to share their ground breaking biomedical research with audiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time

(Thursday) 9:00 am - 2:45 pm EDT

Location

University of Toronto MacLeod Auditorium

1 King's College Circle

Organizer

Gairdner Foundation

Speakers for this event

  • Dr. Akira Endo

    Dr. Akira Endo

    President, Biopharm Research Laboratories; Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan

    The Work: Dr. Endo discovered the first statin drug, compactin, and demonstrated its clinical efficacy. Statins are a class of drugs with remarkable cholesterol-lowering properties that have revolutionized the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD). They lower the part of cholesterol known as “bad cholesterol”, technically known as low density lipoprotein or LDL cholesterol. Dr. Endo sifted through thousands of organisms, hunting for natural substances(products) that block a key enzyme in the biochemical pathway that produces cholesterol, a major contributor to CHD. The organism he found does exactly that and his work stimulated Merck to launch a drug-development program that led, 20+ years ago, to the first statin approved for medical use. This advance paved a path for other pharmaceutical companies to follow. The Impact: Statins are now routinely used to prevent and treat CHD throughout the world. Although CHD is aggravated by multiple risk factors, reducing LDL levels alone makes a significant impact. By discovering statins, Dr. Endo ushered in a new era in preventing and treating CHD and it is estimated that millions of people have extended their lives through statin therapy.

    President, Biopharm Research Laboratories; Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan

  • Dr. Antoine Hakim

    Dr. Antoine Hakim

    Emeritus Professor, Neurology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

    The Work: Dr. Hakim is one of Canada’s most distinguished scientists who has earned a world-renowned reputation for his leadership in neuroscience research with an emphasis on stroke research. In the early 1980's Dr. Hakim characterized a penumbral region around a stroke’s ischemic core — brain tissue with enough energy to survive for a short time after blood loss and with the potential to regain normal function if blood flow was restored. Dr. Hakim, who joined the University of Ottawa in 1992, led the charge to set up the Canadian Stroke Network, a network of centres of excellence; he then partnered with the Heart and Stroke Foundation and other organizations to develop and apply a nation-wide Canadian Stroke Strategy. This work was critical to changing attitudes towards strokes, which went from being a devastating condition to one that is preventable, treatable and repairable. The Impact: In 2006, Dr. Hakim and colleagues published the first ‘Canadian Best Practice Recommendation for Stroke Care’ (updated in 2008, 2010 and 2012) and developed performance indicators and toolkits for healthcare providers to set up stroke units and improve emergency medical services. They also instituted a multi-layered national education program to enhance stroke prevention and the delivery of acute stroke care through the coordination of services and the implementation of best practices. Within five years of the Strategy’s implementation, Ontario alone saw referrals to stroke prevention clinics increase by 34% and stroke patient admissions decrease by 11%.

    Emeritus Professor, Neurology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

  • Dr. Cesar Victora

    Dr. Cesar Victora

    Emeritus Professor, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil

    The work: Dr. Victora’s career has focused on the factors affecting maternal and child health in low- and middle income countries. He has concentrated in the three main areas of child health and nutrition, health program monitoring and evaluation, and health equity. Returning to Brazil after his doctorate, he helped set up one of the longest running birth cohort studies in the world, the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort, in which 6,000 individuals are being followed up to the present time. His studies helped establish the influence of the first 1,000 days (from conception until the age of two years) on lifelong outcomes, including chronic diseases and human capital. The Impact: Possibly, Dr. Victora’s greatest contribution to Public Health was his work in the 1980s with the first study showing the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for preventing infant mortality. His findings contributed to global policy recommendations by UNICEF and the World Health Organization for mothers to breastfeed their infants exclusively for the first six months of life. More recently, his long-term birth cohorts documented the benefits of breastfeeding for adult intelligence, education and income, as well as the long-term consequences of early-life undernutrition. Dr. Victora also made important contributions on how to evaluate the impact of health programs on child mortality and on the study of social inequalities in child health.

    Emeritus Professor, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil

  • Dr. David Julius

    Dr. David Julius

    Professor & Chair, Department of Physiology; Morris Herzstein Chair in Molecular Biology and Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

    The Work: Dr. Julius has used distinctive molecules from the natural world – including toxins from tarantulas and coral snakes, and capsaicin, the molecule that produces the “heat” in chili peppers – to understand how signals responsible for temperature and pain sensation are transmitted by neural circuits to the brain. In his research Dr. Julius has homed in on a class of proteins called TRP (pronounced “trip”) ion channels to discover how the chemical compound responsible for the spicy heat of chili peppers – called capsaicin – elicits a burning sensation when eaten or touched. The research led to the identification and cloning of the specific protein responsible, named TRPV1. On the flip side, Dr. Julius has used menthol, a natural cooling agent, to identify a receptor for “real” cold. This protein, named TRPM8, is a close molecular cousin of TRPV1, pointing to a common mechanism for sensing temperature. As in the case of TRPV1, this ion channel contributes to hypersensitivity to cold, such as that experienced after chemotherapy or other types of nerve injury. The Impact: Somatosensation, our sense of touch and pain, serves as a warning system to guard us against injury. While critical to our survival and well-being, this system can become hypersensitive, resulting in chronic pain. This work helps to explain how such positive and negative aspects of pain sensation arise – insight that is critical to understanding the genesis of chronic pain syndromes. One indication of the importance of this work to medicine is the interest in TRP channels as potential targets for a new generation of painkillers.

    Professor & Chair, Department of Physiology; Morris Herzstein Chair in Molecular Biology and Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

  • Dr. Huda Zoghbi

    Dr. Huda Zoghbi

    Professor, Baylor College of Medicine; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Director, Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, USA

    The Work: Trained as a child neurologist, Zoghbi could not bear the plight of children affected by devastating neurological diseases so she pursued research in hope of helping her patients. After encounters with patients with Rett syndrome—a disorder that strikes after a year of normal development and presents with developmental regression, social withdrawal, loss of hand use and compulsive wringing of the hands, seizures and a variety of neurobehavioral symptoms—she decided to find its genetic roots. The biggest challenge was that Rett syndrome is typically a sporadic disorder (one in a family) and the genome was neither mapped nor sequenced. Zoghbi’s perseverance paid off when after a 16-year search she discovered that Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in MECP2. Zoghbi revealed the importance of MeCP2 for the function of various neuronal subtypes and pinpointed the contributions of various neuronal subtypes in the brain to various neuropsychiatric features. Zoghbi also provided evidence that the brain is exquisitely sensitive to the levels of MeCP2 and that doubling MeCP2 levels causes progressive neurological deficits in mice. This disorder is now recognized as MECP2 Duplication Syndrome in humans. Her recent work showed the symptoms of adult mice modeling the duplication disorder can be reversed using antisense oligonucleotides that normalize MeCP2 levels. The Impact: The discovery of the Rett syndrome gene provided a straightforward diagnostic genetic test allowing early and accurate diagnosis of the syndrome. It also revealed that mutations in MECP2 can also cause a host of other neuropsychiatric features ranging from autism to juvenile onset schizophrenia. Further, it provided evidence that an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or an intellectual disability disorder (IDDs) can be genetic even if it is sporadic (not inherited). Today we know that dozens of ASDs and IDDs are caused by sporadic new mutations. Moreover, her discovery opened up a new area of research on the role of epigenetics in neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Her use of an antisense oligonucleotide to lower MeCP2 levels provides a potential therapeutic strategy for the MECP2 duplication syndrome and inspires similar studies for other duplication disorders.

    Professor, Baylor College of Medicine; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Director, Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, USA

  • Dr. Lewis Kay

    Dr. Lewis Kay

    Professor, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Toronto; Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    The Work: Professor Kay and his coworkers have made important contributions to the field of biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, with the development of methods that are used to ‘visualize’ protein molecules in their natural solution environment and to obtain information about how their shapes evolve in time, leading to biological function. These methods have shed light on how molecules involved in neurodegeneration can form abnormal structures that ultimately lead to diseased states. In addition, his work has extended our understanding of how cellular machines function and how the communication between different parts of these machines can be targeted for the development of drugs in the fight against certain cancers. The Impact: His research has expanded our understanding of the flexible nature of protein structure and the importance of flexibility to both function and malfunction. This, in turn, has led to new insights into what the key regions of molecules might be for drug targeting. The methods developed by Dr. Kay are used in labs around the world, including those researching illnesses such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. The tools developed by his research group are disseminated freely and are extensively used worldwide.

    Professor, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Toronto; Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  • Dr. Rino Rappuoli

    Dr. Rino Rappuoli

    Chief Scientist and Head External R&D, GSK Vaccines, Siena, Italy

    The work: Dr. Rappuoli is a pioneer in the world of vaccines and has introduced several novel scientific concepts. First, he introduced the concept that bacterial toxins can be detoxified by manipulation of their genes (genetic detoxification, 1987). Next, the concept that microbes are better studied in the context of the cells they interact with (cellular microbiology, 1996), and then the use of genomes to develop new vaccines (reverse vaccinology, 2000). In the process of reverse vaccinology the entire genomic sequence of a pathogen is screened using bioinformatics tools to help determine which genes code for which proteins, against which vaccines can be developed. The impact: Dr. Rappuoli also worked on several molecules which became part of licensed vaccines. He characterized a molecule, CRM197, that today is the most widely used carrier for vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae, meningococcus and pneumococcus. Later he developed a vaccine against pertussis containing genetically detoxified pertussis toxin and the first conjugate vaccine against meningococcus C that eliminated the disease in the United Kingdom in 2000. His work on reverse vaccinology led to the licensure of the first meningococcus B vaccine approved in Europe and Canada in 2013 and USA in 2015.

    Chief Scientist and Head External R&D, GSK Vaccines, Siena, Italy

Schedule

    • Day 1
    • October 26, 2017
    • 9:00 am Welcome & Chair's Remarks9:00 am - 9:05 amJanet Rossant, President & Scientific Director, The Gairdner Foundation Chair: Dr. Brenda Andrews, Ph.D. University Professor, C.C., FRSC, Charles H. Best Chair of Medical Research University of Toronto

    • October 26, 2017
    • 9:10 am 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture9:10 am - 9:40 am Lewis Kay, Professor, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Toronto; Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    • October 26, 2017
    • 9:40 am 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture9:40 am - 10:10 amRino Rappuoli, Chief Scientist and Head External R&D at GSK Vaccines, Siena, Italy

    • October 26, 2017
    • 10:10 am Health Break10:10 am - 10:30 am---

    • October 26, 2017
    • 10:30 am 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture10:30 am - 11:00 amDavid Julius, Professor & Chair, Department of Physiology; Morris Herzstein Chair in Molecular Biology and Medicine, UCSF, San Francisco, California, USA

    • October 26, 2017
    • 11:00 am 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture11:00 am - 11:30 amAkira Endo, President, Biopharm Research Laboratories; Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan

    • October 26, 2017
    • 11:30 am Lunch Break11:30 am - 1:00 pm--- (1:00- 1:05 pm) Chair: Dr. Lea Harrington, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, Telomere Length Homeostasis and Genomic Instability research unit, IRIC Professor, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal Visiting Professor, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh

    • October 26, 2017
    • 1:05 pm 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture1:05 pm - 1:35 pmHuda Zoghbi, Professor, Baylor College of Medicine; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Director, Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA

    • October 26, 2017
    • 1:35 pm 2017 Canada Gairdner Wightman Award Laureate Lecture1:35 pm - 2:05 pmAntoine Hakim, Emeritus Professor, Neurology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

    • October 26, 2017
    • 2:05 pm 2017 John Dirks Canada Gairdner Global Health Award Laureate Lecture2:05 pm - 2:35 pmCesar Victora, Emeritus Professor, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil

    • October 26, 2017
    • 2:35 pm Thanks & Conclusion2:35 pm - 2:45 pmJanet Rossant, President & Scientific Director, The Gairdner Foundation, Toronto, Ontario

201726oct9:00 am- 2:45 pm2017 Gairdner Laureate Symposium9:00 am - 2:45 pm EDT University of Toronto MacLeod Auditorium, 1 King's College CircleEvent Type:National Program,SymposiaEvent Audience:Biomedical Scientists,Public,Students

Event Details

Featuring all seven of our 2017 Canada Gairdner Award laureates, The Gairdner Foundation’s annual laureate research symposium brings together leading Canadian and international scientists to share their ground breaking biomedical research with audiences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time

(Thursday) 9:00 am - 2:45 pm EDT

Location

University of Toronto MacLeod Auditorium

1 King's College Circle

Organizer

Gairdner Foundation

Speakers for this event

  • Dr. Akira Endo

    Dr. Akira Endo

    President, Biopharm Research Laboratories; Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan

    The Work: Dr. Endo discovered the first statin drug, compactin, and demonstrated its clinical efficacy. Statins are a class of drugs with remarkable cholesterol-lowering properties that have revolutionized the prevention and treatment of coronary heart disease (CHD). They lower the part of cholesterol known as “bad cholesterol”, technically known as low density lipoprotein or LDL cholesterol. Dr. Endo sifted through thousands of organisms, hunting for natural substances(products) that block a key enzyme in the biochemical pathway that produces cholesterol, a major contributor to CHD. The organism he found does exactly that and his work stimulated Merck to launch a drug-development program that led, 20+ years ago, to the first statin approved for medical use. This advance paved a path for other pharmaceutical companies to follow. The Impact: Statins are now routinely used to prevent and treat CHD throughout the world. Although CHD is aggravated by multiple risk factors, reducing LDL levels alone makes a significant impact. By discovering statins, Dr. Endo ushered in a new era in preventing and treating CHD and it is estimated that millions of people have extended their lives through statin therapy.

    President, Biopharm Research Laboratories; Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan

  • Dr. Antoine Hakim

    Dr. Antoine Hakim

    Emeritus Professor, Neurology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

    The Work: Dr. Hakim is one of Canada’s most distinguished scientists who has earned a world-renowned reputation for his leadership in neuroscience research with an emphasis on stroke research. In the early 1980's Dr. Hakim characterized a penumbral region around a stroke’s ischemic core — brain tissue with enough energy to survive for a short time after blood loss and with the potential to regain normal function if blood flow was restored. Dr. Hakim, who joined the University of Ottawa in 1992, led the charge to set up the Canadian Stroke Network, a network of centres of excellence; he then partnered with the Heart and Stroke Foundation and other organizations to develop and apply a nation-wide Canadian Stroke Strategy. This work was critical to changing attitudes towards strokes, which went from being a devastating condition to one that is preventable, treatable and repairable. The Impact: In 2006, Dr. Hakim and colleagues published the first ‘Canadian Best Practice Recommendation for Stroke Care’ (updated in 2008, 2010 and 2012) and developed performance indicators and toolkits for healthcare providers to set up stroke units and improve emergency medical services. They also instituted a multi-layered national education program to enhance stroke prevention and the delivery of acute stroke care through the coordination of services and the implementation of best practices. Within five years of the Strategy’s implementation, Ontario alone saw referrals to stroke prevention clinics increase by 34% and stroke patient admissions decrease by 11%.

    Emeritus Professor, Neurology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

  • Dr. Cesar Victora

    Dr. Cesar Victora

    Emeritus Professor, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil

    The work: Dr. Victora’s career has focused on the factors affecting maternal and child health in low- and middle income countries. He has concentrated in the three main areas of child health and nutrition, health program monitoring and evaluation, and health equity. Returning to Brazil after his doctorate, he helped set up one of the longest running birth cohort studies in the world, the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort, in which 6,000 individuals are being followed up to the present time. His studies helped establish the influence of the first 1,000 days (from conception until the age of two years) on lifelong outcomes, including chronic diseases and human capital. The Impact: Possibly, Dr. Victora’s greatest contribution to Public Health was his work in the 1980s with the first study showing the importance of exclusive breastfeeding for preventing infant mortality. His findings contributed to global policy recommendations by UNICEF and the World Health Organization for mothers to breastfeed their infants exclusively for the first six months of life. More recently, his long-term birth cohorts documented the benefits of breastfeeding for adult intelligence, education and income, as well as the long-term consequences of early-life undernutrition. Dr. Victora also made important contributions on how to evaluate the impact of health programs on child mortality and on the study of social inequalities in child health.

    Emeritus Professor, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil

  • Dr. David Julius

    Dr. David Julius

    Professor & Chair, Department of Physiology; Morris Herzstein Chair in Molecular Biology and Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

    The Work: Dr. Julius has used distinctive molecules from the natural world – including toxins from tarantulas and coral snakes, and capsaicin, the molecule that produces the “heat” in chili peppers – to understand how signals responsible for temperature and pain sensation are transmitted by neural circuits to the brain. In his research Dr. Julius has homed in on a class of proteins called TRP (pronounced “trip”) ion channels to discover how the chemical compound responsible for the spicy heat of chili peppers – called capsaicin – elicits a burning sensation when eaten or touched. The research led to the identification and cloning of the specific protein responsible, named TRPV1. On the flip side, Dr. Julius has used menthol, a natural cooling agent, to identify a receptor for “real” cold. This protein, named TRPM8, is a close molecular cousin of TRPV1, pointing to a common mechanism for sensing temperature. As in the case of TRPV1, this ion channel contributes to hypersensitivity to cold, such as that experienced after chemotherapy or other types of nerve injury. The Impact: Somatosensation, our sense of touch and pain, serves as a warning system to guard us against injury. While critical to our survival and well-being, this system can become hypersensitive, resulting in chronic pain. This work helps to explain how such positive and negative aspects of pain sensation arise – insight that is critical to understanding the genesis of chronic pain syndromes. One indication of the importance of this work to medicine is the interest in TRP channels as potential targets for a new generation of painkillers.

    Professor & Chair, Department of Physiology; Morris Herzstein Chair in Molecular Biology and Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA

  • Dr. Huda Zoghbi

    Dr. Huda Zoghbi

    Professor, Baylor College of Medicine; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Director, Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, USA

    The Work: Trained as a child neurologist, Zoghbi could not bear the plight of children affected by devastating neurological diseases so she pursued research in hope of helping her patients. After encounters with patients with Rett syndrome—a disorder that strikes after a year of normal development and presents with developmental regression, social withdrawal, loss of hand use and compulsive wringing of the hands, seizures and a variety of neurobehavioral symptoms—she decided to find its genetic roots. The biggest challenge was that Rett syndrome is typically a sporadic disorder (one in a family) and the genome was neither mapped nor sequenced. Zoghbi’s perseverance paid off when after a 16-year search she discovered that Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in MECP2. Zoghbi revealed the importance of MeCP2 for the function of various neuronal subtypes and pinpointed the contributions of various neuronal subtypes in the brain to various neuropsychiatric features. Zoghbi also provided evidence that the brain is exquisitely sensitive to the levels of MeCP2 and that doubling MeCP2 levels causes progressive neurological deficits in mice. This disorder is now recognized as MECP2 Duplication Syndrome in humans. Her recent work showed the symptoms of adult mice modeling the duplication disorder can be reversed using antisense oligonucleotides that normalize MeCP2 levels. The Impact: The discovery of the Rett syndrome gene provided a straightforward diagnostic genetic test allowing early and accurate diagnosis of the syndrome. It also revealed that mutations in MECP2 can also cause a host of other neuropsychiatric features ranging from autism to juvenile onset schizophrenia. Further, it provided evidence that an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or an intellectual disability disorder (IDDs) can be genetic even if it is sporadic (not inherited). Today we know that dozens of ASDs and IDDs are caused by sporadic new mutations. Moreover, her discovery opened up a new area of research on the role of epigenetics in neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Her use of an antisense oligonucleotide to lower MeCP2 levels provides a potential therapeutic strategy for the MECP2 duplication syndrome and inspires similar studies for other duplication disorders.

    Professor, Baylor College of Medicine; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Director, Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute, Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX, USA

  • Dr. Lewis Kay

    Dr. Lewis Kay

    Professor, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Toronto; Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    The Work: Professor Kay and his coworkers have made important contributions to the field of biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, with the development of methods that are used to ‘visualize’ protein molecules in their natural solution environment and to obtain information about how their shapes evolve in time, leading to biological function. These methods have shed light on how molecules involved in neurodegeneration can form abnormal structures that ultimately lead to diseased states. In addition, his work has extended our understanding of how cellular machines function and how the communication between different parts of these machines can be targeted for the development of drugs in the fight against certain cancers. The Impact: His research has expanded our understanding of the flexible nature of protein structure and the importance of flexibility to both function and malfunction. This, in turn, has led to new insights into what the key regions of molecules might be for drug targeting. The methods developed by Dr. Kay are used in labs around the world, including those researching illnesses such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease. The tools developed by his research group are disseminated freely and are extensively used worldwide.

    Professor, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Toronto; Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  • Dr. Rino Rappuoli

    Dr. Rino Rappuoli

    Chief Scientist and Head External R&D, GSK Vaccines, Siena, Italy

    The work: Dr. Rappuoli is a pioneer in the world of vaccines and has introduced several novel scientific concepts. First, he introduced the concept that bacterial toxins can be detoxified by manipulation of their genes (genetic detoxification, 1987). Next, the concept that microbes are better studied in the context of the cells they interact with (cellular microbiology, 1996), and then the use of genomes to develop new vaccines (reverse vaccinology, 2000). In the process of reverse vaccinology the entire genomic sequence of a pathogen is screened using bioinformatics tools to help determine which genes code for which proteins, against which vaccines can be developed. The impact: Dr. Rappuoli also worked on several molecules which became part of licensed vaccines. He characterized a molecule, CRM197, that today is the most widely used carrier for vaccines against Haemophilus influenzae, meningococcus and pneumococcus. Later he developed a vaccine against pertussis containing genetically detoxified pertussis toxin and the first conjugate vaccine against meningococcus C that eliminated the disease in the United Kingdom in 2000. His work on reverse vaccinology led to the licensure of the first meningococcus B vaccine approved in Europe and Canada in 2013 and USA in 2015.

    Chief Scientist and Head External R&D, GSK Vaccines, Siena, Italy

Schedule

    • Day 1
    • October 26, 2017
    • 9:00 am Welcome & Chair's Remarks9:00 am - 9:05 amJanet Rossant, President & Scientific Director, The Gairdner Foundation Chair: Dr. Brenda Andrews, Ph.D. University Professor, C.C., FRSC, Charles H. Best Chair of Medical Research University of Toronto

    • October 26, 2017
    • 9:10 am 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture9:10 am - 9:40 am Lewis Kay, Professor, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Toronto; Senior Scientist, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    • October 26, 2017
    • 9:40 am 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture9:40 am - 10:10 amRino Rappuoli, Chief Scientist and Head External R&D at GSK Vaccines, Siena, Italy

    • October 26, 2017
    • 10:10 am Health Break10:10 am - 10:30 am---

    • October 26, 2017
    • 10:30 am 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture10:30 am - 11:00 amDavid Julius, Professor & Chair, Department of Physiology; Morris Herzstein Chair in Molecular Biology and Medicine, UCSF, San Francisco, California, USA

    • October 26, 2017
    • 11:00 am 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture11:00 am - 11:30 amAkira Endo, President, Biopharm Research Laboratories; Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Japan

    • October 26, 2017
    • 11:30 am Lunch Break11:30 am - 1:00 pm--- (1:00- 1:05 pm) Chair: Dr. Lea Harrington, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, Telomere Length Homeostasis and Genomic Instability research unit, IRIC Professor, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal Visiting Professor, School of Biological Sciences, University of Edinburgh

    • October 26, 2017
    • 1:05 pm 2017 Canada Gairdner International Award Laureate Lecture1:05 pm - 1:35 pmHuda Zoghbi, Professor, Baylor College of Medicine; Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Director, Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute at Texas Children’s Hospital, Houston, Texas, USA

    • October 26, 2017
    • 1:35 pm 2017 Canada Gairdner Wightman Award Laureate Lecture1:35 pm - 2:05 pmAntoine Hakim, Emeritus Professor, Neurology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

    • October 26, 2017
    • 2:05 pm 2017 John Dirks Canada Gairdner Global Health Award Laureate Lecture2:05 pm - 2:35 pmCesar Victora, Emeritus Professor, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil

    • October 26, 2017
    • 2:35 pm Thanks & Conclusion2:35 pm - 2:45 pmJanet Rossant, President & Scientific Director, The Gairdner Foundation, Toronto, Ontario




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